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Guildnet Closes Its Doors

On August 21, 2018, Guildnet CEO, Alan R. Morse, notified employees that the company will be closing its doors as of December 1, 2018, leaving New Yorkers in need of managed long-term care (MLTC) services at a disadvantage. The Guildnet program was designed to offer therapeutic/medical care, home healthcare services, case management, and medical equipment to those who qualify and will be in need of the provided services for a minimum of 120 days. Guildnet announced that by January 1st of 2019, all medical services to their 8,211 managed long-term care members will be terminated. United Healthcare, who until recently offered a partial MLTC plan, will also be pulling out of several counties in up-state New York by February of 2019, affecting nearly 1,500 enrollees who are said to be notified of these changes by November.

Guildnet’s managed long-term care members will be given a 90-day grace period to enroll in a new plan. Members who fail to switch care programs before the deadline will be automatically assigned to a care plan.  After enrolling in a new plan, Guildnet members will be able to switch their plan within 120 days should their new plan be deemed insufficient. The new care plan must honor the same service plan that the former Guildnet member received in the past and allow members to be seen by the same providers unless otherwise agreed to. The new care plan must perform a comprehensive care evaluation.

The void left by Guildnet and other MLTC providers leaving can bring about uncertainty about the continuity of home care services. If you or a loved one has been affected by the closing of Guildnet or the disruption of service from another MLTC association, it is imperative that you contact an experienced New York Medicaid and elder law attorney, who can guide you through the process. The attorneys at Hobson-Williams, P.C. are dedicated to representing clients with diligence and compassion. For an initial consultation, contact the New York Medicaid attorneys at Hobson-Williams, P.C. by calling 866-825-1LAW.

 

Revocable Living Trust

A revocable living trust allows assets within the trust as well as income generated by those assets to be managed and distributed by the trustee. The trust income and property are then distributed in accordance with the terms and conditions of the trust. This type of trust is referred to as a living trust because it is established during the life of the creator.

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Antibiotic Usage in Nursing Homes Linked to Serious Health Problems

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), up to 70% of nursing home residents are prescribed antibiotics during the course of any given year, ranging in cost between $38 million to $137 million per year. Recently, the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) released the results of a study that linked the high usage of antibiotics in nursing homes to many health problems such as gastroenteritis, clostridium difficile, and resistance to superbugs, drug-resistant germs.

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New York Required to Hand Over Records on Disabled Patients

On March 18, 2016, U.S. District Court Judge Gary Sharpe ruled that the Cuomo administration and New York’s Justice Center must disclose records related to the abuse of disabled and mentally ill patients in the State’s care. Disability Rights New York (DRNY) has requested records involving disabled youths and adults who were allegedly abused, on multiple occasions but all of the requests were denied.

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The Musical Icon Prince May Have Died Without a Will

According to documents obtained by People Magazine, Prince did not have a Last Will and Testament. Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson filed an Emergency Petition in a Minnesota Court seeking the appointment of a Special Administrator.

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Operation Cocoon

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Customs and Border Protection Agency are working together to combat a new trend of drug traffickers who fool seniors into becoming international drug mules.  Traffickers either forge a relationship with seniors or promise inheritance or other monetary incentives.  In targeting the elderly, traffickers hope that the drugs pass through security undetected.  This scheme has worked to some degree because eighty-three U.S. citizens who fell victim to drug trafficking tricks have been arrested in foreign countries since 2013.

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Special Needs Trust Can Provide Effective Financial Relief for the Disabled Elderly.

Federal and State law provides a number of programs to help a person with disabilities.  Such programs include. Security Income and Medicaid. Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is a federal program that provides monthly cash payments to people in need. SSI is for individuals who are 65 or older, as well as for blind or disabled people of any age, including children.

However, to qualify for SSI and Medicaid an applicant must own less than $2,000 in assets. The value of your home does not count if you live in it. Usually, the value of your car does not count and the value of certain other resources, such as personal items or a burial plot, may not count either. Continue reading “Special Needs Trust Can Provide Effective Financial Relief for the Disabled Elderly.”

Pour Over Wills

As many individuals begin to plan for their future and the future of their estate, they are shocked by how many options there are. Many people are familiar with the term “will” and its significance, but too often individuals are also unfamiliar with any other estate planning instruments.

If you have started the process of looking into protecting your assets, an estate planning attorney may have recommended that you create a revocable living trust as the key document in your estate plan, rather than a will. A revocable living trust, if done correctly, will allow your estate to bypass the probate process, as well as keep your information private. Wills become a part of the public record after your death, whereas trusts do not. Continue reading “Pour Over Wills”

Certified Home Health Agencies not permitted to reduce hours previously authorized without due process

On April 8th  and 15th, 2011,  the State Commissioner of Health sent all CHHA administrators two directives reminding them that state law  does not allow CHHAs to reduce home health aide services that were previously authorized, without doctor’s orders and notice and hearing rights.  Similarly, if a CHHA client is hospitalized, or in temporary short-term rehabilitation, these changes do not allow the CHHA to abandon them — the CHHA must reinstate the same home health services after the hospital or rehab stay is over, if the client continues to need the services as prescribed by his/her treating physician.